Repeating history

In 2008, Nova Scotia’s Department of Natural Resources (now the Department of Lands and Forestry) set out to create The Path We Share, a natural resources strategy setting long term goals for our province’s forestry sector and its biodiversity, among other things. This document, released in 2011, attempted to strike a long sought balance between...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Tree drama

My favourite tree is probably the American beech, not because it’s the tallest or longest lived member of Maritime ecology, but because it’s beautiful, and comes with a compelling history. At one time the majority of Maritime trees were American beech, so astoundingly common that before the 20th century hikers of all stripes were overwhelmed...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Sports and the end of the world

I’ve worked several newsrooms in my time, always at small rural papers and always as the only man on staff. As a consequence I became the de facto sports reporter, expected to assemble an entire section of the paper with photos, scores, interviews with players and coaches, and my insights on the worlds of hockey,...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

An Ode to Empty Skies

I have a long and complicated relationship with the passenger pigeon, an extinct bird which came to my attention one sleepless night six years ago, and which eventually became the subject of my novel The Sky Was Copper Blue. Writing about it, I hoped, would get it out of my head, but of course that...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Halifax thrashes Calgary

The spirit of competition is a wonderful thing, a magic ingredient which turns speed skating with sticks into a game of hockey, pushing people to lengths they couldn’t otherwise justify and toward milestones we wouldn’t otherwise notice. Except I don’t play hockey, and the last time I sacrificed my shoulders in contact sports was high...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Sable

The remotest island in all of Canada is a 42 kilometre long sliver of sand gracing our continental shelf, formed 10,000 years ago by the workings of glaciers. We call her Sable. To this day its shores support the largest breeding colony of grey seals on Earth alongside several endemic species like the Ipswich sparrow...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Movers and Shakers

Insects, more so than any other class of animal, are the movers and shakers of the Maritimes, responsible for more ecological processes even than the large, charismatic mammals who so often inspire our dutiful conservation. Insects, in their untold abundance and diversity, matter more to our landscape even than the mighty moose, or elusive lynx....

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Burning Forests

I never thought we’d be scraping the bottom of the barrel like this. While Nova Scotian forests once yielded European fleets and world class lumber, today they have been degraded so completely that, in our desperation to continue the roller-coaster ride of clearcut forestry, we’ve begun chopping down the scraps and torching them for electricity,...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

An Earth-Saving Diet

When it comes to saving the world your mind probably goes to electric cars and solar panels, which are great ideas but not yet within everyone’s reach. In a decade, perhaps, their plummeting prices will allow them to conquer the market, but not yet, certainly not in my household. Thankfully there’s another solution, to both...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading

Refuge worthy of a king

At one time, the American chestnut made up a full quarter of all trees in the mixed deciduous forests of eastern North America, conquering canopies from southern New England north into Ontario. The King of the Forest, they called it, not only for its commanding stature but also its chestnut bounties and fine lumber.  ...

A subscription is required to access this section of the website

To become a print subscriber, phone our office at 902-485-8014

To subscribe to the web version click here

Thank you for supporting democracy, journalism and jobs in our community

Log In Register

Continue Reading