Repeating history

In 2008, Nova Scotia’s Department of Natural Resources (now the Department of Lands and Forestry) set out to create The Path We Share, a natural resources strategy setting long term goals for our province’s forestry sector and its biodiversity, among other things. This document, released in 2011, attempted to strike a long sought balance between...

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Tree drama

My favourite tree is probably the American beech, not because it’s the tallest or longest lived member of Maritime ecology, but because it’s beautiful, and comes with a compelling history. At one time the majority of Maritime trees were American beech, so astoundingly common that before the 20th century hikers of all stripes were overwhelmed...

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Movers and Shakers

Insects, more so than any other class of animal, are the movers and shakers of the Maritimes, responsible for more ecological processes even than the large, charismatic mammals who so often inspire our dutiful conservation. Insects, in their untold abundance and diversity, matter more to our landscape even than the mighty moose, or elusive lynx....

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Reconciliation in the Watershed comes to Tatamagouche on September 16

Connecting the local ecology with Indigenous rights, and identifying ways to renew relationships with Indigenous peoples and the Tatamagouche watershed are some of the expected outcomes of a day-long workshop entitled Reconciliation in the Watershed on Saturday, September 16 at the Tatamagouche Centre. The day-long workshop runs 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the centre,...

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