My father’s traphouse

One-room community schools in Nova Scotia, including the one on Pictou Island, were in the process of closing their doors during the late 1950s and 1960s. Students in grades 9 and up were required to attend newly built superior high schools. Advanced elementary schools were also being considered for grades 9and under. Many Pictou Islanders...

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Anchors away …

The year 1966 saw my brother Vincent fish in a 40-foot wooden boat that he called the SS MAGOT. That name in itself makes for an interesting story. Clinton MacDonald from Alma and Waley Daley from Pictou were a couple of young lads who were helping Vincent to fish the fall herring. On one cool...

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Christmas concerts involved entire community

Hilton A. McCully taught in the Pictou Island School 1944-46. The teacher, students and other islanders would participate in making up a program that was to be presented at the annual Christmas concert. Islanders would partake in helping to put on a real hilarious show every year. Most of the material used in the skits...

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Shrieks from monsters in the woods …

Far out in the Northumberland Strait lies a tiny island where maybe even today imaginary monsters roam in its woods … I recall my earlier years living on Pictou Island when monsters supposedly lurked in the woods behind our homes. You see every Pictou Island landowner had their own woodlands. Just about every islander would...

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Pictou Island’s mail delivery

I would like to recount a true story that the late Dr. Roland Sherwood wrote and shared with me some 30 years ago. In his early life, Mr. Sherwood worked for the Telephone Company. The following is a true story of a winter excursion that he made to repair phone service to Pictou Island in...

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Ice, fire, a race and a brawl …

The Northumberland Strait was full of ice on May 1st 1965. It has been eight months since we moved off Pictou Island. My parents, however, were going to stay in our house on Pictou Island during lobster season. Four days prior on April 26th there was a lot of scattered ice. Nevertheless, my father and...

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Slap shots and stealing apples …

Just east of the wharf on Pictou Island lies the home of Edward and Mary Rankin. This large house displays the fine architectural talents of past Pictou Islanders. That house was constructed from lumber sawed and taken from the woods on Pictou Island by Laughlin Rankin. Laughlin was Edward’s father and he passed away in...

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