The storm of 1957

It was a beautiful sunny plus 75 degree fall day on September 25 1957. Herring fishing had been underway since August 19th. There were a few fishermen from the mainland and probably about eight-island fisherman including my father who had been setting their nets around Pictou Island. Melvin MacDonald, Arnold MacMillan, Harold Bennett, Duncan, Lauchie,...

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My father’s traphouse

One-room community schools in Nova Scotia, including the one on Pictou Island, were in the process of closing their doors during the late 1950s and 1960s. Students in grades 9 and up were required to attend newly built superior high schools. Advanced elementary schools were also being considered for grades 9and under. Many Pictou Islanders...

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Caught … in a trap

My memory has me recalling those times when I, as a small boy, would sail to and from my home on Pictou Island with my parents. During those earlier years, my father had the 30-foot boat named Slo-Mo-Shun which he had built himself in 1951. This sleek boat powered by a 289 cubic inch V-8...

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Cookhouses provided virtual smorgasbord of eats

During the 1960s, one-room community schools in Nova Scotia – including the one on Pictou Island – were in the process of closing their doors. Many Pictou Islanders didn’t want their children leaving their homes alone and moving to the mainland to attend the larger schools. Several Island families began to leave their roots on...

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